Euglandina rosea (Férussac, 1821) Rosy Wolfsnail Cannibalism

   The fact that Euglandina rosea engages in cannibalism is common knowledge among Wolfsnail aficionados and is likely to have been witnessed personally by anyone who has attempted to maintain two or more specimens in captivity housed in a single container. This reporters experience has been that when you put two like sized specimens together you never know for sure whether they will engage in courtship/mating or one specimen will devour the other. The greater the size difference between a pair the more likely it is that the smaller of the two will become a meal. Witnessing cannibalism in a captive environment is easy. Seeing it occurring in the wild is rare although seeing the results is rather common. Freshly deceased undamaged empty shells with mostly devoured animals is the usual evidence.

Euglandina rosea (Férussac, 1821) Rosy Wolfsnail Cannibalism

Euglandina rosea (Férussac, 1821) Rosy Wolfsnail Cannibalism

Euglandina rosea (Férussac, 1821) Rosy Wolfsnail Cannibalism

    From the roadside swale on the west side of US-1 about 3.1 miles northwest of International Golf Parkway, St. Johns County, Florida, 1/8/2019.

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